Use Tango

Hello,

I intend to install the tango virtual machine on a server, and then use it to control a remote device. so is it necessary to install tango (vm) on this equipment or not? what is the first step for control? the equipment consisting of sensors, plc allenbradly … etc

Edited 2 months ago
na
so is it necessary to install tango (vm) on this equipment or not?

What equipment are you talking about in this sentence (server, sensors, plc?).

na
what is the first step for control? the equipment consisting of sensors, plc allenbradly … etc

It all depends on your equipment.
To control an equipment with Tango, you will need a tango device server which is able to communicate with your equipment.
The device server might already exist, have a look at the device classes catalog (Developers menu -> Classes catalog from tango-controls.org website or https://www.tango-controls.org/developers/dsc ).
It seems like there is already a Tango class for AllenBradleyPLC:
https://www.tango-controls.org/developers/dsc/ds/1018/
You can look at the documentation there, get the code from its repository and eventually contact the contact person if you need more details on how to use it. For this class, the contact person is jmchaize (no e-mail specified in the Tango device classes catalog, strange!?).
Here is his e-mail: chaize <at> esrf <dot> fr

If no Tango class was already written yet to communicate with your equipment, you will need to write a new Tango class.
In this case, the first step will be to understand how you can communicate with your equipment (is there a network protocol, serial line communication, …?). You should look at the documentation of your equipment for that.
Once you know how to communicate with your equipment, you will need to map that into Tango class attributes and commands.
You can generate most of the code of your device server using POGO code generator.
Then you will have to add the code specific to communicate with your equipment.
You can have a look at other Tango classes to see how it was done for some other equipment.

Of course, the Tango documentation can help as well.

Hoping this helps a bit,
Reynald
Rosenberg's Law: Software is easy to make, except when you want it to do something new.
Corollary: The only software that's worth making is software that does something new.

Hello,

my question is poorly formulated sorry smileI mean by equipment: an industrial process containing sensors, valves … etc and the control part is PLC
my objective is to recover all the data of these sensors by communicating directly with PLC without creating peripheral servers for each component is it possible?
but the AllenBradlyPLC Device Server does not exist on the Tango VM?
and about the installation I will install the VM on a remote server and the process is also remote so it is necessary to install the local VM where is the process or not?
na
Hello,

my question is poorly formulated sorry smileI mean by equipment: an industrial process containing sensors, valves … etc and the control part is PLC
my objective is to recover all the data of these sensors by communicating directly with PLC without creating peripheral servers for each component is it possible?

You can use a Tango device server able to communicate with your PLC.
It could be enough for your use case.
It could still be interesting to have dedicated Tango device classes for each type of sensor, valve, etc…
The main interest is that you would have a Tango device (an object) for each sensor/valve with some meaningful attributes names (temperature, pressure, …) and command names (open, close for a valve).

na
but the AllenBradlyPLC Device Server does not exist on the Tango VM?

The VM is a Linux box. You can install whatever you want on it.
So you could compile and install this AllenBradlyPLC Tango device server on the VM (or on any host where the Tango library is installed).

na
and about the installation I will install the VM on a remote server and the process is also remote so it is necessary to install the local VM where is the process or not?

You only need to have your Tango device servers running on a host having network access to your PLC.
Rosenberg's Law: Software is easy to make, except when you want it to do something new.
Corollary: The only software that's worth making is software that does something new.
 
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